Bruce Campbell Adamson PO Box 1003 Aptos, CA 95001-1003

 

 

AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER WITH

MINNIE CAMPBELL ADAMSON -- Copyright by B. C. Adamson

 

For sale the Queen of Larchmont Shores through the roaring 1920s and 1930s. This painting was restored by Leonardo Cota of Beverly Hills. The painting and frame measure 35 inches by 44 inches and the frame is original closed corner. Frame has been restored with new cloth trim. On the back of the painting it states that "Presented to my dear husband Christmas 1940, age 58". Her husband was the developer of the LARCHMONT SHORES ESTATES. This painting is offered directly by the Adamson family and is one of the last paintings Ercole Cartotto painted before his death on Jan. 5, 1943.

 

 

Minnie and Brother Herbert J. Campbell at Larchmont ----- October 1935

 

 

 

You Can't Take It With You!

After the death of my uncle in 1980, aunt "Gretchen" Mrs. Harold Adamson gave me this painting. People assume that because I am the nephew of Harold Adamson that I am rich. Well, I am rich in history, but I have not inherited a single dime from the royalities of Harold Adamson's lyrics. Yet, I am proud of my heritage and his talent. Also that Harold's wife "Gretchen" treated me like a son, taking me to the Academy for film debutes and helping me out with her positive guidance. I know she would be happy to see "Minnie" find her way back to Larchmont, N.Y. or Scotland in a beautiful setting. One may note that her son wrote the lyrics to An Affair To Remember the American Film Institute's fifth most romantic film ever and Harold received his fifth Oscar nomination. One may see the resemblence of "Minnie" of that of Cary Grant's mom in the film in which Deborah Kerr painted Cary'ss mom after being struck by a car. Minnie's husband James was good friends with a founder of the motion picture industry George Eastman. Harold must have had his mother "Minnie Campbell-Adamson in mind when he wrote the lyrics to An Affair to Remember. One can read more on Harold Adamson at http://ciajfk.com/harold.html.

This is one of Cartotto's last paintings it could carry more value. I would like see Minnie Campbell find herself back in Scotland where she originated from Argylle-Bute County perhaps. I have had Minnie in a gloomy storage locker for over 20 years, which she does not deserve, and because Minnie's son wrote his last Oscar nomination for Deborah Kerr, whom like Minnie was also born in Helensburgh, just maybe someone might be interested in the painting. Any reasonable offer may be submitted to Bruce Adamson at bca@got.net email or in writing to Bruce Adamson, P.O. Box 1003, Aptos, CA, 95001. Item is a museum piece and will be insured when shippinig. Signed Photograph from Deborah Kerr to Harold Adamson. below.

View a list of other notables from Helensburgh, Scotland by Clicking here.

 

Interesting note is that Harold wrote a song for film Suzy in which Cary Grant made an attempt at singing and Harold received his first Oscar nomination when Jean Harlow sung what would be one of her last songs before passing at the young age of 26 years old.

 

Ercole Cartotto

Biography of Ercole Cartotto was born in Valle Mosso, Piemonte, Italy on Jan. 26, 1889 son of Joseph and Tersilla (Quazza) Cartotto. On January 26, 1922 he married Elena Tortorella and had two daughters Beatrice Catherine and Joan Therese. He came to the United States in 1905. He was educated at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston from 1909-1916. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1918. Cartotto pained notables as Calvin Coolidge, Mrs. Calvin CoolidgeAmong the struggling young lawyers was Calvin Coolidge. Photograph of Painting of Calvin Coolidge and painting by E. Cartotto.

 

 

 

It was said that as a $6 a week worker in a silk mill at Northhampton, Mass., Mr. Cartotto dreamed of the day when he would paint the portrait of the man who was later to be President. Mr. Coolidge was then Mayor of Northampton. Subsequently Mr. Cartotto came to New York, opened a studio and painted the portraits of Mrs. John Wanamaker, Mrs. Gurnee Munn, Elliott Daingerfield and others before he was chosen in 1925 by Phi Gamma Delta, the late President's fraternity, to go to the White House for the sittings. He took seven weeks and the portrait was subsequently hung in the Phi Gamma Delta Club in New York. Mr. Cartotto is represented by portraits hung in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, the Vatican in Rome, the Fine Art Galleries in San Diego, CA; Cleveland Ohio Museum of Art, Columbia University, N.Y., Museum of Ticonderoga, N.Y., Smith College Museum of Art, Amherst College, Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass., Newark (N.J.) Museum, Fordham University, Harvard University, Converse College, Spartanburg, S.C., State House, Montpelier, Vermont, State House, Trenton, N.J., Mansion Museum Pioneer Memorial State Park, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington D.C., the Museum of Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, and many more.

Many of his portraits of notable political figures hang in the State Houses of the States whence they came. The Metropolitan was the recipient of his work "Mary Catherine," which was interest because it is a silver point drawing. He discovered after considerable research a metallic preparation which gave an effect similar to the silver pointing of Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Durer and Fra Angelico, which had sometimes been considered a lost art. Ercole Cartotto of Darien, Conn, died on Jan. 5, 1943 at the age of 57. Cartotto painted Charles Edison (August 3, 1890 ­ July 31, 1969) was a son of Thomas Edison and Mina Miller. He was a businessman, who became Assistant and then United States Secretary of the Navy, and served as the 42nd Governor of New Jersey. Cartotto painted the well known poet Robert Frost also the father-in-law of Charles A. Lindbergh, Dwight Morrow. View more of Ercole Cartotto's portraits by ": Clicking here.

 

 

The Queen of Larchmont Shores

Marion "Minnie" Campbell Adamson

Biography of Marion "Minnie" Campbell Adamson age 58 -- QUEEN OF LARCHMONT SHORES 1920-30s Ercole Cartotto painted Marion "Minnie (Campbell) Adamson. Famly history of subject: Minnie was born in Helensburgh, Scotland and married James Harold Adamson in 1907. Her husband was written up in Dale Carnegie's book "How To Win Friends and Influence People." Jim was also the developer of Larchmont Shores in Westchester County, N.Y. where Minnie and Jim lived on Cedar Island throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Minnie and Jim's home still remains next door to the Larchmont Yacht Club. Minnie entertained many celebrities such as Anna Mae Wong, George Eastman, Feliz Von Luckner and many more. Minnie's brother-in-law and her husband formed a partnership and invented the first stretchable clothing that was marketable "Lastex". A product which has literally touched almost everyone on this planet. (A 40 page book: "The Adamson Brother's, The Men who developed Lastex," comes with sale). The Adamson Brothers sold the trademark to the United State Rubber Company in 1931. Another brother-in-law was Ernest Martin, Chief Camera engineer for Vitagraph pictures. Martin worked on films with Rudolph Valentino and the first movie wired for sound Don Juan.

Photo above shows: "Hal" in baby buggy; Minnie sister top row; James front row with Minnie and sister Florence; directly behind him is Seth and directly behind Tom is Percy who invented "Lastex" and The Adamson Brother's Company sold trademark to the Dupont's U.S. Rubber Company.

 

Minnie's Husband James Harold Adamson

James Adamson, Sr., had previously earned a living as a mining engineer in England. It was this inheritable trait which most likely lead his son, James, Jr., to develop Larchmont Shores in Westchester County, New York. This feat was no easy task, for the younger Adamson had planned to develop a tract of 290 homes by shipping out granite rock from the City of New York. Because of "Lastex" James would lose this development. Larchmont Shores was built on bed rock shipped weighing many tons, from the New York subways and was shaped into walls at least 20-feet wide at the base. "Like Broadway, which did not grow, but was the work of man, so was Larchmont Shores." James Adamson's steam shovels were broken and dredges disabled by coming in contact with the bed rock that was under the entire development. James was compelled to blast rock with dynamite for some of his waterways to make channels deep enough at low tide. James understood that the homeowners would not want to contend with any water. One can see that the argument against firm foundations and dry cellars was absurd, as every cellar would be laid on bed rock and eighteen inches above the high water level, which would insure the most stable construction possible. The bathing beach was a wonder in a remarkably short time. "One wouldn't believe it possible to bring about such a wonderful change in so short of a time." From a marsh-land to a real beauty spot and ideal for waterfront homes with open waterways to the Long Island Sound.

Minnie's sons Harold and Douglas Adamson

One of James and Minnie's sons, Harold Adamson was a songwriter and wrote several hundred songs for the movies, T.V. and Broadway. Such tunes as WWII hits Buy a Bond, Coming In On A Wing and a Prayer; Perry Como's Here Comes Heaven Again, Around the World in 80 Days, (1956); I Love Lucy, (1953); An Affair To Remember (1957); Time on My Hands, with Mack Gordon and Vincent Youmans (1931); Frank Sinatra's first Academy Award nomination "I Couldn't Sleep A Wink Last Night," in (1943). Harold was nominated five times for an Oscar by the Academy of Motion Pictures of Arts. For complete list of songs by Harold go to following URL http://ciajfk.com/harold.html Also see Above the painting is photo of Harold singing to Frank Sinatra in 1943, authographed by Frank Sinatra in 1989.

The Origin of Douglas Lane in Larchmont Shores

Another son Douglas Morrison Adamson married Nancy Kissam Ely. Douglas Lane in Larchmont Shores is a street named in honor of Douglas Adamson. "Doug" sailed around the world in 1935 on Allen Viller's ship the Joseph Conrad which today rests at the Mystic Connecticut port museum. Douglas was voted by Billboard Magazine in 1948 one of the top ten discjockies in the country. Douglas Adamson was a real estate broker in Beverly Hills for 20 years and was the business partner of Jack Hupp in the firm Adamson & Hupp. Douglas made history in Bel Air when he sold Ronald Reagan's friend, Earle Jorgensen (Jorgensen Steel Company founder). Douglas sold five and one half acres at the top of Bel Air, CA, for $240,000 which was then a record in 1954. Earning both sides of the commission by getting exclusive listing from heiress of Scott Tissue. Earle Jorgensen was the man "Kitchen Cabinet" who got Ronald Reagan elected as our President. When Reagan had more electoral votes than any other President he watched the results from the same home that Douglas had sold to Earle Jorgensen many years earlier.

Jorgensen and his wife became friends with actor Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy. In 1966 Jorgensen and auto dealer Holmes Tuttle urged Reagan to run for governor in California, and they then lined up political consultants for him and raised funds. After Reagan's successful bid, the two men became part of Reagan's "kitchen cabinet" of businessmen advisors. Jorgensen and his cohorts continued to support Reagan's political aspirations, backing him in his 1976 effort to become president of the United States, and his successful run in 1980. Reagan made a tradition of watching his election returns after dinner at Jorgensen's house. Reportedly, the president's staunch support for the free enterprise system was very much influenced by his friend's success story, that of building a major company from $2.50 raised from a hocked suit. While Jorgensen accepted an appointment to the State College Board of Trustees in California, when Reagan became president he had no interest in joining many of his friends who moved to Washington to take government posts. Asked why by one of his stepsons, Jorgensen explained, "That's not my business. I need to stick to what I know best."

Read more on Earl Joregensen at: http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/history2/22/Earle-M-Jorgensen-Company.html

 

Minnie's Daughter-in-law Nancy Kissam Ely

had an interesting Family Background

Nancy Ely's grandfather, great grandfather and great great grandfather were all trustees and attornies for the Astor Estate. Two of them having built the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1894 and 1897. Nancy's great grandfather, was George W. Ely, Secretary of the New York Stock Exchange from 1873 to 1899 and again from 1905 to 1919. The Life and Times of Captain George W. Ely; Another great grandfather was Rufus Easton, appointed by Thomas Jefferson, Judge of the Louisiana Territory and talked out of a duel with vice-president Aaron Burr. Nancy was also directly descended from George Calvert, First Lord Baltimore and founder of Maryland and his son first governor of Maryland. You are buying this painting from Minnie's grandson, Bruce Campbell Adamson who is the son of Douglas Adamson.

Marion "Minnie" (Campbell) Adamson died on January 5, 1954.

Minnie died on same day as E. Cartotto, eleven years later.

 

EBAY AUCTION

 

An Affair to Remember --
Marion "Minnie Campbell-Adamson--
lists for $5,000 at Ask Art

The Queen of Larchmont - Minnie lived on Cedar Island --

Douglas Lane is named for her son, my father --
PICKING UP PAINTING IS AVAILABLE--

This painting was restored by Leonardo Cota of Beverly Hills. The painting and frame measure 35 inches by 44 inches.

Estimated shipping costs are estimated at $220.00. Shipping will require it to be sent registered insured mail. Painting of "Minnie" had to be one of the last by Ercole Cartotto for he passed away a few years later. This painting was painted in 1940. Painting looks very much like the mother of Cary Grant's in the film An Affair to Remember ; subject Marion Campbell's son received his fifth and last Oscar nomination lfor writing the lyrics to this film songg. Ironically Marion Campbell and Deborah Kerr actress were both born in Helensbourgh, Scotland. Merely coincidence?

 

Biography of Ercole Cartotto

Cartotto was born in Valle Mosso, Piemonte, Italy on Jan. 26, 1889 son of Joseph and Tersilla (Quazza) Cartotto. On January 26, 1922 he married Elena Tortorella and had two daughters Beatrice Catherine and Joan Therese. He came to the United States in 1905. He was educated at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston from 1909-1916. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1918.

Cartotto painted notables as Calvin Coolidge, Mrs. Calvin Coolidge, Dwight Morrow, Dr. John H. Finley, Judge William H. Moore, Lady Isabella Howard, Dr. Edward Hitchcock, Professor John Mason Tyler, Attorney General John g. Sargent, Chief Justice Harlan F. Stone, Mr. and Mrs. George D. Pratt, Percival Lowell, Charles M. Pratt, Stanley King, Professor Frederick J.E. Woodbridge, Arthur F. Egner, Miss Beatrice Winser, John Cotton Dana, Robert Frost, Governor Charles Edison, Vice Chancellor Malcolm G. Buchanan, Professor Alfred V. Churchill, Mrs. John Sherman Hoyt, Lt. Comdr. James A. Farrell, Jr., Mrs. Helen Hines Tison, Master MacFarlane Cates.

In 1919 Ercole Cartotto won second prize for the National Academy Awards for painting a Portrait of Miss Marion Ryder. In 1905 when Cartotto was a young immigrant boy working in Northhampton, Mass. he learned to speak English by listening in his spare time to court cases. Among the struggling young lawyers was Calvin Coolidge. It was said that as a $6 a week worker in a silk mill at Northhampton, Mass., Mr. Cartotto dreamed of the day when he would paint the portrait of the man who was later to be President. Mr. Coolidge was then Mayor of Northampton.

Subsequently Mr. Cartotto came to New York, opened a studio and painted the portraits of Mrs. John Wanamaker, Mrs. Gurnee Munn, Elliott Daingerfield and others before he was chosen in 1925 by Phi Gamma Delta, the late President's fraternity, to go to the White House for the sittings. He took seven weeks and the portrait was subsequently hung in the Phi Gamma Delta Club in New York.

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CALVIN COOLIDGE

Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933)
Thirtieth President (1923-1929)

When Calvin Coolidge became Warren Harding's Vice President in 1921, Washington did not know what to make of this reserved onetime governor of Massachusetts. Of "Silent Cal's" honesty, however, there was no doubt, and his succession to the presidency on Harding's death in 1923 was a comforting antidote to the unfolding scandals of his predecessor's administration.

Declaring once that "the chief business of the American people is business," Coolidge was content to entrust the country's well-being to private initiative. His hands-off policy suited the public mood well. Many claimed, moreover, that it was largely responsible for the country's soaring prosperity. Unfortunately, the boom did not last. Shortly after Coolidge left office, the nation plunged into the worst depression in its history. When the original version of this portrait was unveiled in 1929, a critic wrote that Coolidge looked as if he was about to "bite the person . . . who, obviously, had been annoying him." The aim of artist Ercole Cartotto, however, had been to portray his presidential subject as a "man absorbed by duty and steeled by responsibility."

Joseph E. Burgess (1891-1961), after Ercole Cartotto
Oil on canvas, 1956
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Gift of the Fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta
NPG.65.13

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Mr. Cartotto is represented by portraits hung in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, the Vatican in Rome, the Fine Art Galleries in San Diego, CA; Cleveland Ohio Museum of Art, Columbia University, N.Y., Museum of Ticonderoga, N.Y., Smith College Museum of Art, Amherst College, Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass., Newark (N.J.) Museum, Fordham University, Harvard University, Converse College, Spartanburg, S.C., State House, Montpelier, Vermont, State House, Trenton, N.J., Mansion Museum Pioneer Memorial State Park, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington D.C., the Museum of Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, and many more. Many of his portraits of notable political figures hang in the State Houses of the States whence they came.

The Metropolitan was the recipient of his work "Mary Catherine," which was interest because it is a silver point drawing. He discovered after considerable research a metallic preparation which gave an effect similar to the silver pointing of Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Durer and Fra Angelico, which had sometimes been considered a lost art.

Ercole Cartotto of Darien, Conn, died at the age of 57.

Biography of Marion "Minnie" Campbell Adamson

History of Marion "Minnie (Campbell) Adamson. Minnie was born in Helensbourgh, Scotland and married James Harold Adamson in 1907. Her husband was written up in Dale Carnegie's book "How To Win Friends and Influence People." Jim was the developer of Larchmont Shores in Westchester County, N.Y. where Minnie and Jim lived on Cedar Island next door to Larchmont Yacht Club. See photos above on Minnie and her husband; son Harold with Sinatra.

Her brother-in-law and her husband formed a partnership and invented the first stretchable clothing that was marketable "Lastex" and sold the trademark to the United State Rubber Company in 1931. Another brother-in-law was Ernest Martin, Chief Camera engineer for Vitagraph pictures. Martin worked on films with Rudolph Valentino and the first movie wired for sound Don Juan staring John Barrymore.

One of Minnie's three sons, Harold Adamson was a songwriter and wrote several hundred songs for the movies, T.V. and Broadway. Such tunes as Around the World in 80 Days, (1956); I Love Lucy, (1953); An Affair To Remember (1957); Time on My Hands, with Vincent Youmans (1931); Frank Sinatra's first Academy Award nomination I Couldn't Sleep A Wink Last Night, in (1943). Harold was nominated five times for an Oscar by the Academy of Motion Pictures of Arts. His first and last nominations were films in which Cary Grant acted in. In the mid 1930s Cary sung one of Hal first Oscar nominating songs "Did I Remember." The last nomination was An Affair to Remember in 1957.

Marion "Minnie" Campbell Adamson died on January 5, 1954. Seller was born a year later in 1955.

 

If you have any questions please email me